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Single hive wraps.


This method of wintering hives uses one insulated black wrap that goes over each hive individually. This has got to be the easiest way to winter hives in that, it is very little work. In 4 easy steps the hive is ready for winter.

  • Take the hive top off.
  • Slide insulation over hive.
  • Place insulation on top of the hive
  • Replace hive top.
There is no heavy lifting, and you can leave the hives in the same place year round. For top insulation I use 2″ blue Styrofoam between the inner cover and the hive lid. Single and double chamber hives can be wintered this way.
These wraps are available from NOD Apiary, visit their website for more information.
Hives with a black insulated tarp around each hive. Ready for the Manitoba winter.

Hives with a black insulated tarp around each hive. Ready for the Manitoba winter.

Insulated hive covered in snow after a Manitoba snow fall.

Insulated hive covered in snow after a Manitoba snow fall.

Winter snow fall builds up in front of the top entrance. Even if the entrance snows shut completely air can still get in and out because the snow is soft and porous.I find that the snow build up makes for a nice wind break from the cold winter winds.

Early winter, no snow on top of the hives yet.

Early winter, no snow on top of the hives yet.

Here is a picture of the top entrance in early winter with hardly any snow on the ground yet. The seam in front provides a fairly good wind protection.

Front bottom entrances completely snowed in.

The bottom of the black wrap loosely covers the bottom entrance. The bottom entrance can get completely buried in snow without effecting the hive. As long as the top entrance remains open this doesn’t present a problem that I can see.

Bee hive in Manitoba almost completely buried in snow.

Bee hive in Manitoba almost completely buried in snow.

Hives are almost completely buried. Snow also acts as a good insulator.

Warm air from the cluster creates a tunnel through the ice and snow so that the hive and breath.

Warm air from the cluster creates a tunnel through the ice and snow so that the hive and breath.

The top entrance remains open even if the snow piles up on top of it. The warm air from the cluster creates air tunnels through the snow and ice.
A typical Manitoba snow cover which can sometimes even bury hives in double brood chambers.

A typical Manitoba snow cover which can sometimes even bury hives in double brood chambers.

Hives snowed in quietly waiting for the coming of spring.

Hives snowed in quietly waiting for the coming of spring.

Smile